LED Lighting for Earth
LED Lighting for Earth

LED Lighting for Earth

Office lighting accounts for a considerable percentage of any given office’s operating expenses. This is why LED office lighting is being used by offices all over to reduce lighting expenses. The most common type of office lighting today is fluorescent office lighting. Compared to incandescent office lighting, fluorescent office lighting is quite efficient, but contains hazardous materials. LED office lighting proves to be the better choice.

Office lighting fixtures are usually 2 or 4 foot fluorescent T8s, which can be replaced with an LED office lighting T8 fixture. Office lighting also often contains recessed lighting, or cans, that use either incandescent or halogen lamps. There are several different kinds of screw-type LED replacement bulbs that are perfect for use in this kind of office lighting.

LED office lighting not only saves the facility money and conserves precious energy but also improves on the light quality of standard office lighting. The white light of fluorescent office lighting and the overbearing beam of incandescent or halogen office lighting are giving way to the subtle, bathing clarity of LED office lighting. The office lighting fixture not only provides better light quality, but looks better than other office lighting fixtures. Whatever the size of the office lighting system, it still stands to greatly benefit from LED office lighting fixtures. In the US, there are upwards of 100 million exit signs running 24/7, typically using energy-wasting incandescent technology that consumes estimated 30-35 billion kilowatt-hours (kWh) of electricity annually. Conventional incandescent exit sign bulbs, which last about 2.8 months (when operated 24 hours/day) use 350 kWh, cost $28 per year to run, and create 574 pounds of CO2 pollution. In contrast, CFL exit signs (lasting 10.8 months), use 140 kWh, cost $11 to run each year, and produce about 230 pounds of CO2 emissions.

Another cost factor involved in office lighting is employee efficiency. The wrong amount or the wrong kind of light can result in eyestrain, glare, and headaches, which in turn can decrease employee productivity. Switching to high performance lighting can improve employee efficiency by 6.7 percent. Office lighting retrofits can be relatively inexpensive with quick return on investment (five years or less). A lighting upgrade in one Pacific Northwest National Laboratory building resulted in annual electricity savings of $6,167 and 154,163 kilowatt-hours of energy.